Posted on Leave a comment

Theragun has 4 new quiet massage guns, new CBD products — and it’s now called Therabody – CNET

Theragun, one the best-known names in the field of “percussive therapy” is launching four new massage guns — and changing its name. Theragun (the company) will officially become Therabody, though the actual massage guns will continue to be sold under the Theragun name. And one of the first areas the newly minted Therabody is expanding into is a new line of CBD products. 

All of that news was originally scheduled to be unveiled last month. In fact, a preview event for journalists in Manhattan in March was the last media event I attended before the city was completely shut down by the coronavirus pandemic. But the company could delay the news only so long, and now it’s moving forward with the big announcements.  

These changes don’t mean the company is moving away from the percussion massager therapies that soothe sore muscles, treat chronic pain, increase blood flow, assist in muscle recovery and decrease pain. If anything, they’re leaning into their role in the health and wellness community. 

new-theragun-products

Freshly named Therabody has a new line of Theragun massage guns and TheraOne CDB products to work into your wellness routines for muscle relief.

David Carnoy/CNET

Hands-on: 4 new Theragun models

The quartet of new massage guns — so named because they generally feature pistol grips and pound your muscles like an automated masseuse — range from the new flagship Theragun Pro ($599) to an impressive new compact model, the Theragun Mini ($199). International pricing isn’t yet available, but $599 converts to approximately $480 or AU$930.

The line is filled out with two more fourth-gen models, the Theragun Elite ($399) and Theragun Prime ($299). They correspond to the previous generation’s Theragun G3 and Theragun Liv but have an improved motor that lowers their volume. 

Read more: The best percussive massage gun for 2020

theragun-mini

theragun-mini

The $200 Theragun Mini retains the company’s signature triangular design and is surprisingly powerful.

David Carnoy/CNET

The big upgrade in these new models is the company’s new QuietForce Technology, a new high-tech proprietary motor that’s significantly quieter than previous models yet just as powerful. That should address the main gripe about Theragun devices — that they’re louder than competing models. 

All of the new Theragun models (except for the Mini) can connect via Bluetooth to an updated companion app for iOS and Android. Theragun says the app syncs with Apple Health, Google Fit and Samsung Health to “deliver guided treatments uniquely suited to your behaviors, modalities and preferences.” The Pro and Elite models have customizable speeds, force meter, personalized presets and OLED screens. 

theragun-pro-4th-gen

theragun-pro-4th-gen

The new Theragun Pro is a handful.

David Carnoy/CNET

The 1.5-pound (0.7 kg) Theragun Mini is designed to be portable, easily fitting in a backpack or purse. While it doesn’t have quite the power of one of Theragun’s full-size devices, it’s more powerful than you’d think for its small size. I’ve tried larger massage guns in this price range and it’s as powerful but half the size. It’s likely to become the best-selling model in the line. 

The fourth-gen Theragun Pro, the only model in the line with 60 pounds of force, a rotating arm and swappable batteries, may be the best massage gun I’ve used. I like the Hyperice’s Hypervolt Plus, which is relatively quiet and powerful and on sale now for $349 at Best Buy. But Theragun’s massage guns have an ergonomic triangular design. You can grip the device from different sides of the triangle, which makes it easier to hit those harder-to-reach spots with enough pressure. 

That said, the Theragun Pro costs $599 or $250 more than the Hypervolt Plus. The fairer comparison is between the Hypervolt Plus and the new Theragun Elite, which has 40 pounds of force and isn’t a big step down from the Pro. The Pro has the rotating arm, extra swappable battery and six additional antimicrobial cell-foam attachments instead of five. 

Theragun

The renamed Therabody hopes to develop into a broader wellness brand. With that in mind, it’s moving into the CDB arena with a new line of topical and ingestible USDA Certified Organic CBD products. It says the new products, called TheraOne, are derived from a “proprietary blend of high-efficacy hemp.” The idea is to combine physical percussive therapy with homeopathic therapy to decrease muscle pain and shorten recovery times. They’ll range in price from $55 to $80.

The company also introduced a new “smart” vibrating foam roller, the Wave Roller ($149).  

Here’s a quick recap of the main specs of the new Theragun devices, according to Therabody. 

Commercial-grade deep muscle massager that connects with an app for guided treatment (3 preset routines available). Rotating arm with two swappable batteries (150 minutes each). OLED screen with Force meter. 60 pounds of force, 16mm amplitude with unlimited speed range (1,750 to 2,400 percussions per minute). Six cell-foam attachments included along with travel carrying case and pouch for attachments.

Available in black or white, this is the new premium mainstream model in the line. Connects with an app for personalized treatment. OLED screen with Force meter. 40 pounds of force, 16mm amplitude with unlimited speed range (1,750 to 2,400 percussions per minute). Five cell-foam attachments included along with travel carrying case. 

Also has app integration but has a simple LED instead (instead of screen) with five preset speeds. 30 pounds of force, 16mm amplitude. 120-minute battery life. Four cell-foam attachments included along with protective travel pouch.  

Only 1.5 pounds and measuring 6 by 5.3 by 2.4 inches (152 by 134 by 57mm), the Mini is ultraportable yet powerful. 20 pounds of force, 12mm amplitude with three speeds (1,750, 2,100 or 2,400 percussions per minute). Rechargeable battery lasts 150 minutes. A neoprene protective case is included. 

The information contained in this article is for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended as health or medical advice. Always consult a physician or other qualified health provider regarding any questions you may have about a medical condition or health objectives.

Leave a Reply